22
Nov 04

GERRY AND THE PACEMAKERS – “I Like It”

Popular8 comments • 1,324 views

#152, 22nd June 1963

More jollity from the Mitch Murray Merseybeat hit factory. Vigorous to the point of being smackable, “I Like It” is a cute song nevertheless. All the chin-tickling and tie-straightening is neatly, evocatively specific, and deserves a lighter treatment than it gets: “I Like It” should be as flirtatious as its coquettish object. As it is Gerry Marsden yells, nudges and winks his way through a record which gets old well before its two-and-a-bit minutes end.

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Comments

  1. 1
    Tom on 4 Apr 2008 #

    This is the Popular entry with the least number of hits (not counting ones up for < a week)

  2. 2
    Marcello Carlin on 4 Apr 2008 #

    I’d be inclined to give this a higher mark; energetic, fairly innocent and a nice little link between vaudeville and power pop.

  3. 3
    wichita lineman on 8 Jun 2008 #

    So very chipper, it’s surely an improvement on their first hit. The compressed Nashville piano slip-notes are an almost jazzy cherry on the top.

  4. 4
    Lena on 6 Jul 2011 #

    More Mersey madness here: http://musicsoundsbetterwithtwo.blogspot.com/2011/07/end-of-era-gerry-and-pacemakers-im-one.html Thanks for reading as always!

  5. 5
    wichitalineman on 6 Jul 2011 #

    Around this time, Gerry Marsden confronted Brian Epstein and said he was devoting too much time to the Beatles and not enough to the Pacemakers. They were probably selling equal amounts of records, were immensely popular and hardworking, and he felt fully justified. It was night time. Epstein walked over to the window. “Gerry, look at the sky” he said. “The Beatles are like the moon, the sun, and all of the stars in the sky.” Marsden nodded, wondering where this was going. Then Epstein pointed at a bare lightbulb dangling above their heads. “And that’s you” he said.

  6. 6
    Jimmy the Swede on 7 Jul 2011 #

    That was the beginning of that light bulb’s career, which came to an abrupt end when it stupidly tangled with Edward Woodward in the early seventies.

  7. 7
    richard thompson on 28 Feb 2012 #

    Mitch Murray also wrote I’m telling you now which sounds similar

  8. 8
    lonepilgrim on 28 Jan 2015 #

    Gerry is still the passive partner in the relationship, allowed to ‘come in when your mama ain’t there’ only when his girl lets him. It’s a conservatism that links back to the tepid crooners that proceeded Merseybeat and which stops G & TP from having as much impact as The Beatles. That said it’s a jaunty tune, enlivened by the piano and good for dancing.

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