Posts from 2010

9
Dec 10

MADONNA – “Vogue”

FT + Popular86 comments • 6,771 views

#644, 14th April 1990

After a crucifixion, an ascension: as discussed on the Lollards Of Pop, “Vogue” is Madonna’s attempt to join a pantheon of pop culture icons – “Grace Kelly, Harlow Jean….” and so on. No, not her attempt: her assertion that she is already part of this company by right. She’s the first modern pop star to join it, to rise above the colourised grit and mess of the rock era and act like she belongs in black-and-white.

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7
Dec 10

Freaky Trigger And The Lollards Of Pop (Series 4 – Week 12)

Lollards Podcast2 comments • 507 views

Another week, another conversation. This time I welcome a terrifyingly well-informed team of Magnus Anderson, Al Ewing and Martin Skidmore to talk about something I (demonstrably, audibly) know very little about – the history, present and practice of comics criticism. Links and other clarifications to follow in the comments.

29
Nov 10

Popular: An Apology

FT + Popular9 comments • 1,548 views

Hello readers!

It has been a lot longer than I thought and hoped it would be since I put an entry up. Not that I have nothing to say about “Vogue” – quite the opposite – but I’ve had a difficult few weeks living at my in-laws* mostly without the internet, while our bathroom and kitchen have been rebuilt. This is now at last finished… just in time for a mini-break in Germany. I’m back on Thursday, and either then or on Friday we’ll have a new, stollen-fuelled Popular entry once again.

Thanks to everyone for your patience!

*not difficult because of them!

26
Nov 10

Freaky Trigger And The Lollards Of Pop (Series 4 – Week 11)

Lollards Podcast5 comments • 532 views

DJ Steve Braiden joins Alex Macpherson and host Elisha Sessions on Resonance FM 104.4 to talk about the furrow of club music being busily excavated by Night Slugs and associated factions. We hear an interview with Girl Unit (aka Phil Gamble), we talk a surprising amount about Red Bull Music Academy, and we hear an in-progress remix from Steve as well as some terrific music from 20-year-old Chilean sensation Nicolas Jaar, Nguzunguzu (did I stutter?), and the as-yet-unreleased “Arpjam” by Jam City.

25
Nov 10

Time Reconsidered as a Helix of Semi-Precious Who Eps: #13 ROBOT

FT3 comments • 739 views

or “Computers are very sophisticated idiots

… being a show-by-show TARDIS-esque (ie in effect random) exploration of Doctor Who Soup to Nuts, begun at LJ’s diggerdydum community, and crossposted at FT.

Fondly remembered old-school nut-and-bolts futuretech thriller — feat.idea as celebrated on countless pulp mag covers — which in xmas 1974 introduced the fourth doctor (BadBaker aka BB), plus companion-to-be chirpy Harry Sullivan, and (I believe) marks the end of UNIT’s regular co-presence in Who stories. Nutshell plot summary: large metal man programmed to obey orders and not harm humans is ORDERED TO HARM HUMANS Now read Asimovly on…

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24
Nov 10

Freaky Trigger And The Lollards Of Pop (Series 4, Week 10)

Lollards Podcast2 comments • 229 views

Guests were Cecily Nowell-Smith, Marna Gilligan and Alasdair MacLean; Hazel Robinson on kn0bs; Mark Sinker was presenter. Topic = how much does it matter to do stuff right, and what’s going on when doing stuff wrong stops being wrong?

15
Nov 10

Time Reconsidered as a Helix of Semi-Precious Who Eps: #12 THE INVASION OF TIME

FT9 comments • 600 views

or “built like a brick shipmaze

… being a show-by-show TARDIS-esque (ie in effect random) exploration of Doctor Who Soup to Nuts, begun at LJ’s diggerdydum community, and crossposted at FT.

Massive epochal 1978 six-parter THE INVASION OF TIME, in which FOUR aka BadBaker aka BB makes himself COMBINATION TIMEH!TLER AND TIMEJUD4S on his absurd august homeworld Gallifrey, faffs around with the constitutional separation of powers established by the legendary RASSILON, uncovers imcompetence, corruption and twee idiocy among the upper layer of his own people, and an INVASION PLOT from — WHO COULD IT POSSIBLY BE FROM? The one tiny clue is a picture on the DVD! Viz a maximum-spoilers REVEAL of the sekrit invaders.

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13
Nov 10

Freaky Trigger And The Lollards Of Pop (Series 4, Week 9)

Lollards Podcast21 comments • 1,318 views

This week the Lollards get Popular! No really! Tom Ewing makes his way to the sprawling Resonance FM studios to preview the next entry in his mammoth project. Mark Sinker, Kat Stevens, and host Elisha Sessions join him for a wide-ranging discussion that takes in Terre Thaemlitz, childhood, pop stars’ relationships with their audiences, a logistical breakdown of the iconic video, and our own marks out of 10. Oh yeah, and “Teen Witch” (1989). Please submit your mental image of Shep Pettibone in the comments, please (no web searches allowed!).

12
Nov 10

Special cheese-with-bits-in edition! (cheesy lovers #101 & #102)

FT + Pumpkin Publog//1 comment • 423 views

Brillat Savarin with a layer of truffle

An extra-creamy French raw milk cow’s cheese, with a layer of fresh truffles running through its centre. I bought this from the truffle stall Tartufaia Truffles.

Brillat Savarin alone is a tasty cheese; rich and creamy, subtley mushroomy, and incredibly indulgent. So how much better (and oinkier!) can the added-truffle version be?

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11
Nov 10

SNAP! – “The Power”

Popular71 comments • 4,521 views

#643, 31st March 1990

SPECIAL POPULAR ANNOUNCEMENT: The NEXT entry after this will be discussed at 7PM tonight on Resonance 104.4 FM, on the Lollards of Pop show. This will feed into the next text entry proper, in a bold new multi-media departure for Popular. Hearing the radio show will in no sense be necessary to understand the entry or subsequent discussion but it might give you some interesting ideas! Tune in!

“The Power” is a bit like “Dub Be Good To Me”‘s European exchange partner – some of the same ingredients but mixed in very different proportions. The song juggles aggression and melancholy, and makes both immediately appealing – the juddering riff which opens “The Power” set against the slow pace and lonesome spaciousness of the production and Pennye Ford’s vocals. The riff is more distinctive than the singing, to be honest, but the contrast works.

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