Posts from 2nd July 2009

2
Jul 09

Freaky Trigger and the Lollards of Pop – Series 3, Week 15 pt2

Lollards Podcast1 comment • 131 views

Pete Baran is joined by Nick Dastoor, Magnus Anderson, Cecily Nowell-Smith and Mark Sinker to talk festivals and the end of the world

(This is for the many podcast clients — we’re looking at you too iTunes — that can’t cope with 2 files per episode.)

Freaky Trigger and the Lollards of Pop – Series 3, Week 15

Lollards Podcast6 comments • 219 views

After last weeks skip week, Freaky Trigger finishes its epic run with a special double length episode coming LIVE from Glastonbury (sort of). Pete Baran is joined by Nick Dastoor, Magnus Anderson, Cecily Nowell-Smith and Mark Sinker to talk festivals and the end of the world. Which to some is the same thing. Music from Bowie, Young Marble Giants, The The, and many many more. Thank you for listening!

Two hour long podcasts here so we can maintain quality.

Drag Me To EC Comics

FT2 comments • 468 views

Drag Me To Hell has been hailed as a return to horror for Sam Raimi, a break from the relentlessness of the Spider-Man films (thankfully post the annoying SM3). A chance for Raimi to go back to his roots and entertain without being slavishly devotional to comics or special effects. And it is terrific fun. But its still runs like a comics adaptation, albeit an adaptation of some for ur-horror comic of the fifties. Drag Me To Hell is a EC Comic brought to life.

EC (Entertaining Comics) Horror comics were stuffed with short, horro tales which would often involve
a) moral conundrums
b) stupendously ugly gypsys
c) a unsettling if obvious twist
Drag Me To Hell does all of this, with 2009 nobs on (EC Comic would have balked at the vomiting scene). But the grey morality of the story is what really marks it out. Alison Lohmann’s lead is not a bad person, but she does something which leads her to be cursed. We feel for her a bit, though reserve a touch of judgement because she does after all work for a bank. And so the film goes, Raimi has difficulty balancing the needs of having an attractive lead, with trying not to make her too heroic. It is not clear if he succeeds, that depends on how you feel about the ending, but it is unlikely that in the Manichean morality of most modern films he could succeed.

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