Posts from 11th February 2005

11
Feb 05

Walls

The Brown WedgePost a comment • 285 views

Walls
http://www.themorningnews.org/archives/personalities/fleeting/index.htmlMarshall

Sokoloff’s fotos are large-scale c prints of graffiti that havebeen painted over by civil authorities in places like Toronto andPortland. The great thing is how much they look like graffiti–with the placement, the colouring which offsets the walls, the chaotic painterly skills and esp. how they are placed.

It is almost like painting becoming a virus and it is impossible to euthanize or hygienise tagging. The critical discussion that surroundshis work tends to compare him to traditional easel and canvas abstractionists, which deny the strange and haunting lacunae of the work.

There is presence in absence here, an elephant graveyard of symbols and sets—which does not play poliical advocate of graffiti but notices how history works, the painting over of tags still visible underneath for example—indicating an urban narrative, things come and things go, and paintings emerge and disappear. To record them then, becomes an active way of living cities.

Shark

The Brown WedgePost a comment • 314 views

Shark

Apparently Damien Hirst’s shark is falling apart in his tank, and it is almost impossible for conservators to fix it–he got bad advice in he beginning, and now the New York museum of Modern Art has hired the curator of fish from the Natural History museum (who has the wonderful Dickinson name of Oliver Crimmins) to figure out what the fuck to do. (This was bought and donated by a hedge fund manager, and cost about 12 million dollars)

This is almost as good as the military historian who was hired to figure out what kind of surplus army paint Jackson Pollock painted his later splatter paintings with.

Entropy Wins.

Thanks to Hit or Miss

FT + New York London Paris MunichPost a comment • 538 views

Thanks to Hit or Miss for having us last night. We played an eclectic four-cornered tag-team set to the filmic backdrop of Monkey and FLASH! GORDON! What a great film Flash Gordon is, other films blush at the very name. Anyway, Steve played the indie, Chris played the soul, I played the pop. And Tim played the jazz.

My set (well, four sets of 2 songs each) in full:

V – “Hip To Hip”
Wham! – “Wham! Rap”
Pipkins – “Gimme Dat Ding”
Doop – “Doop”
Midi, Maxi and Efti – “Bad Bad Boys”
Girls Aloud – “Wake Me Up”
Fierce Girl – “Double Drop”
Joy Gruttman – “Schnappi Der Kleine Krokodil (Raveheart Remix)”

We will be announcing some VERY EXCITING NEWS about our own club soon. (Apologies if the exciting news has already been announced on that ILE). One of the things we might be doing is changing the name, because “Club FT”, while perfectly straightforward, is a bit rubbish. Suggestions welcome, front runner at the moment is Poptimism.

DC Comics’ marketing department

The Brown WedgePost a comment • 1,314 views

DC Comics’ marketing department are really giving it some at the moment. Imagine my surprise when I opened up the Guardian this morning to see a great big piece (with large 3-panel excerpt) on Grant Morrison’s new Vinamarama miniseries! You go Grant! The piece neglected to say that it will probably sell half of fuck-all, because you have to go into one of those weird comic shops to buy it. Which I will be doing tomorrow – my first real actual comics buy for, oh, seven years. Cor!

THE KINKS – “Tired Of Waiting For You”

Popular13 comments • 2,634 views

#187, 20th February 1965

Pure mood – a boy, an absence, a wait. There’s barely a context, only the most abstract of frames, all that really lingers is the melancholy chorus, and this gives the single a mystique that the better-known songs around it maybe lack. Before I came to play the song back this morning I was convinced it was a good deal more psychedelic than it is – I remembered exotic instruments, tricksy studio play. They don’t exist but it has some of the lazy, half-dreamt feel of English psychedelia. The bubble is popped for me by Davies’ curiously flat, nasal voice – he’s never a singer I’ve particularly enjoyed but he’s usually much more expressive and convincing than this.