Posts from 27th July 2000

27
Jul 00

“Nick Hornby would never write a book about what’s on his hard drive” – Radiohead bassist Colin Greenwood, talking about the Napster thing. A more convincing argument for the MP3 revolution is tough to imagine, frankly.

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“Nick Hornby would never write a book about what’s on his hard drive” – Radiohead bassist Colin Greenwood, talking about the Napster thing. A more convincing argument for the MP3 revolution is tough to imagine, frankly.

God Almighty, is there

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God Almighty, is there no end to it? The Official Worst Band In The World have some more material to foist upon us. Split up, yeah yeah. Actually the worst aspect of this story is Mr. Corgan’s prose style: give a pop star a keyboard and they think they’re a Beatnik.

Hmm, new nice-about-music NYLPM faltering, I sense.

Empty.org — In Review

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Empty.org — In Review is a writerly music/culture weblog which reminds me vaguely of the Josh Blog with more ‘attitude’. Two writers, haven’t read through it all yet but there’s a good sense of a dialogue going on, seems stronger on alt.pop than other stuff. It mentions poor old Epic Soundtracks in the most recent entry. He was a nice guy and because of that I’ve never really wanted to listen to his music: I just remember him as a good-natured, shambolic customer who brought in good stuff sometimes and was always friendly, a real rarity in the world of second-hand retail. Then I learned he made records, and then I learned he killed himself. So I never bought the records, because I didn’t want to not like them.

Vic Godard

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Vic Godard: continuing the music Tom likes theme, here’s the page I can find which comes nearest to breaking away from facts and anecdotes and actually wrestling with why Subway Sect were such a terrific band. Everything else is oh-how-obscure-they-were and that-Vic-Godard-such-a-character. And even this page doesn’t really knuckle down to matters, but it has a go: “Subway Sect’s most appealing feature was their opposition to rock. They believed punk to be about change. They thought that it would change the nature of music but soon found that it merely perpetuated rock.”

I’ve decided NYLPM is becoming a bit negative in tone

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I’ve decided NYLPM is becoming a bit negative in tone, so I’m going to make an effort to blog useful links about the music I actually like. So here’s an old Interview with Charlemagne Palestine from EST magazine. There are apparently two new C.P. discs coming out, one (Karenina) being a two-disc harmonium-and-vocals tribute to a family pet, and the other, Jamaica Heinekens In Brooklyn (which I have to say I’ll be hunting down first) being a found-sounds and drones collage of a Jamaica Day parade in NYC. You can order those here.

There’s A Tear In My Beer

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There’s A Tear In My Beer: “Online music festival” in ‘rubbish’ shocker. Entertaining stuff, reminding me of my chatroom days where some plonker would always open a ‘virtual beer’ or ‘light up a virtual J’. He would swiftly receive a virtual slap and I a non-virtual ban.

The Beatles treatise on reason and the nature of yesterday

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THE BEATLES TREATISE ON REASON AND THE NATURE OF YESTERDAY

Paul McCartney believes in Yesterday – and in a lot of way he is right to. It has made him a staggering amount of money after all. But I think it might be educational to see exactly what Paul is trying to say when he asserts that he believes in Yesterday.

Firstly there is the idea that Yesterday, as a time period, has an objective reality. If we ignore the problems introduced by pinning down an artificially discrete time period and take it as read that Paul means the day before today we still need to know what kind of existence he holds it to have. Is there a recorder of time, some watcher figure who’s job it is to jot down Yesterday in all of its diverse ways. Temperature in Khazakstan, where Jane Asher was, how many time Ringo attempt a para-diddle and failed. It is more likely that Paul is referring to his own recollection of Yesterday. Which is where fallibility comes in – especially when he admits that suddenly he isn’t half the man he used to be. What if that half that he has lost contains important data about Yesterday (say, like a beat or an interesting melody).

Of course this is all assuming that Paul believes in a discrete Yesterday, rather than some kind of ideal preceding period which could be called All Our Yesterdays. All Yesterday’s Parties could come into this too (hey – there’s an idea – let’s all go to Butlins). Unfortunately the cut and thrust on his philosophy is somewhat obscured by allusions to a lack of permanence in other people and an ill advised stab at discussing game-playing theory akin to Wittgenstein. This may explain his need for a place to hide away, he is well aware that a retreat may give him useful time to really get to the nub of his argument. After all, he missed out the obvious suggestion that what he calls Yesterday could just be a fictional construct put in place to give him a sense of history.

I think in the end, whilst it is interesting to see what McCartney was trying to express vis a vis the standing and power of memory as opposed to our other faculties, Yesterday does not quite cut it as a philosophical tract. Much like Locke, a definite antecedent, he has a number of good ideas but lacks the wherewithal to expound them. A cruel person might say that he would been better singing about Scrambled Eggs. At least you can eat them.

It continues –

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It continues – Cultural Artifacts of the Moment “I turn twenty-one during the half-hour long hellacious fuckoff feedback maelstrom of “You Made Me Realise.” It sounds like a sky so full of airplanes the sun cannot squeak through.” Sometimes I wonder why the rest of us bother.